How Fire Rated Assemblies Are Tested

It’s a New Year, so I thought I would play around with a new medium. I have pulled up a few old videos from various training segments I’ve recorded in the past 5 years. Here is a brief general discussion about how rated assemblies are tested. There is so much more I want you to know about this, but this is not a bad start and it segues into some of the older blog posts we have shared.

In order to make this information practical, so you can use it in the field, please remember that knowing how assemblies are tested helps you understand how they fail when not properly installed. Think about the hose stream test when you are looking at applications with large annular space, with insufficient annular space or installations with just a smear of sealant. These are both critical to the performance of a firestop installation.  The various hyperlinks will bring you to different segments for further discussion if you are interested in learning more.

Please share this with anyone you think might benefit from this information.

As always, if you have any questions or even topics for future blog posts, don’t hesitate to reach out to us.  We are happy to help when we can.

 

UPDATE: Jan 6

I want to give a HUGE shout out to RICK BARONE for making  a correction for me. This video clip was edited from one of the first classes I did when I started teaching again, and as with most things we are new at, there were errors.  I noticed it during editing a few months ago but forgot to comment on it when I posted it.  Rick says it better than I could so I will just include his comments here and say THANK YOU RICK.  I love when people support others to do better.

“You have some inaccuracies in the video…The time temperature curve is controlled by the test facility….If your test specimens furnace isn’t at 1000f at 5 minutes it will be because the lab tech didn’t maintain the time temp curve within the prescribe tolerance. The customer doesn’t fail, the lab must abort the test and rerun..usually at their own cost if they are a credible lab…but a nice start with a new communication vehicle..” Rick Barone 1/5/2017

Fireproof, FIRESTOP, Fire Block- what is the difference- (part 3 of 4)

Hello again, welcome to part 3 of the series where we explain the difference between fireproof, firestop and fire block. You can get the new post here. If you missed the previous blogs here are part 1 and part 2!

Enjoy and keep learning and share this with the next person who gets here terms confused!

Firestop Classes in New Jersey

Hi everyone,

I am excited to announce the schedule for Rutgers Fall classes.  There are  heaps of great classes available in this program, but the ones I am teaching are:

Understanding the Requirements of Firestop Special Inspection- 1705.17

Special inspection (SI) of firestop is a requirement in NJ and since there is no licensing process the local jurisdictions (AHJ) are responsible for ensuring that the contracted inspector is actually qualified.  This class goes over the reporting requirements and a few ways to identify if your SI is up for the job.  Participants will even walk away with a few inspection tricks up their sleeve to try out on their next project.  This class is designed to help the AHJ’s keep the hacks out of their jurisdiction. While there are three slides specific to the NJ building codes, most of the information relates to ASTM E2174, ASTM E2393 and ASTM E3038 and the Chapter of the IBC as it relates to special inspection of firestop.

My favorite comment about this class last semester: “That changes everything!”

Classes will be on Friday, Nov 6 in Parsippany NJ & Thursday, Nov 16 in Cape May NJ


Inspecting Grease Duct Wrap-

We have a bit of fun in this class and do a hands on installation of grease duct wrap on an actual duct.  Okay, so its not a “real” grease duct, because I have to schlep it into the class room and screw it together.  It would fail the light test with your back turned. But the installation is real, the installers and inspectors are real, and the other materials are exactly what is used in the field.  We do an inspection and learn how the mock field installation would fail the required lab tests.  This helps the participants be able to take the technical information into the field more effectively.  Then we talk about some more complication installations, what to look for during inspections.  We end with a discussion of the various materials that are found in the field and this semester we hope to have samples of the factory insulated materials so we can add this to the discussion.

My favorite comment about this class last semester: (at our first break about 90 minutes into a 5 hour class) “I only signed up for the class because I needed the credits for my license.  I didn’t think there was really anything for me to learn here.  My class yesterday was great.  I expected to learn a lot, and I did.  I gotta say though, I’ve learned more in this class already, than I did all day yesterday. “

Tuesday, Nov 28 in Evesham NJ & Tursday, Dec 14 in Sayreville NJ

 

If you are interested in joining any of these classes, or having us present the class in your area,  please email us.

What Exactly is a BEAD of FIRESTOP?

If you have been following this blog, then at this point you are well aware that the annular space is the gap between the penetrating item and the rated assembly. We have also mentioned several times that when there is NO gap it is considered point of contact. Did you know that the firestop needs to be installed differently when there is no annular space than when there is? It makes sense if you think about it. If there is annular space, many firestop details will require 5/8” of sealant be installed INTO the annular space. If there is NO space in which to install the firestop, many installers simply smear the firestop sealant over the top of the rated assembly. When they do this, it is not always obvious that there is point of contact. The installation can easily appear compliant if destructive testing is not conducted. The reality is, however; that the installation does not conform to a tested and listed assembly and in a fire scenario it there is a risk it may fail prematurely. Unfortunately, many installers are not even aware of the liability they create when they do this. It is a bit of a catch 22, if you will. If the inspectors do not catch this mistake, the installers assume that they are doing it right. The jurisdictional inspectors bear no liability for missing this during an inspection, however the new building code requirement calls for third party special inspectors in high-rise and risk category III and IV buildings. These inspectors would likely be liable for missing this during an inspection. The firestop installers certainly would be liable, because they are the ones who are supposed to assess the firestop assembly before the installation. They are the ones who are supposed to know the details they themselves submit.

So, if you are installing or inspecting these firestop installations, what should these point contact locations look like?

First of all let’s be VERY clear that point contact and continual point contact are two different things. An example of continual point contact is when a 1” pipe or conduit is put through a 1” opening. There are very few firestop details that allow for continual point contact. When a firestop detail says annular space can be 0”-1” that generally means that a 1” pipe can easily be installed in a 2” opening. If the pipe is concentrically installed (centered in the opening) then the 1” pipe in a 2” opening would give you apx ½” annular space all the way around the pipe. If it is off center then the annular space would be different on either side. If it is all the way to one side of the opening then the annular space is 0”-1”. The firestop detail will typically call for a bead of firestop at the point of contact. It will also define the size of that bead, so lets take a closer look at what is expected in this case.

Most of the penetrants will pass through the rated assembly at a 90-degree angle. If we remember our geometry classes from way back in middle school, the hypotenuse is the face of the triangle immediately opposite the 90-degree angle. In the diagram below, it is marked as C. When the firestop detail says that the bead of sealant needs to be ½” it means that the hypotenuse must measure ½”.

Now, at what point is the bead supposed to start or stop? This is not clearly detailed in any requirements but my personal opinion is that if the firestop installation calls for ½” of sealant to be installed INTO the annular space, the bead should be required in any space that the required ½” of sealant cannot be installed. This is not a standard. This is not a requirement. This is just Sharron’s opinion, so take it as that. Adopt it as your own if it makes sense. If you disagree, please let me know your argument against it.

On the other hand I have seen inspectors that require that if a bead is installed, it shall be installed all the way around the penetrant. I disagree with this because I feel it encourages installers to complete continual point contact installations and just throw the bead around the entire penetrant.

If there is no tested and listed application for continual point of contact, it should not be allowed. Here are a few examples of continual point contact details. These are the only times it is acceptable to have continual point contact. You will note they are all 1000 series details, meaning metal pipes. WL1054 is an example of a metal pip through a gypsum wall and CAJ1673is an example of a metal pipe in a concrete or block assembly. Please look at item 3, where you will see it allows for continual point contact and will require respectively a ½” or ¼” bead of sealant. Now you know what a bead of sealant should look like and how to measure it properly. Remember it must be tooled to ensure it sticks both to the substrate and to the penetrant. In the case of these two details, please also know that these two manufacturers likely have details that could utilize a more cost effecting non-intumescent material. It should be noted that BOTH of these details need to be done with intumescent firestop and not the less expensive products.

So with that, let me know what you think. Do you agree? Do you disagree? What do you see in the field?

Thank you for taking the time to learn a little bit about the industry in which I work. If you have questions about any of this don’t hesitate to reach out to me. In the meantime, keep learning and continue to make projects better.

 

 

New Definitions for a new understanding of firestop

You can Google all sorts of definitions you will need when you are talking about firestop. The problem is, now you now the meaning of the word, but you still may not understand the impact what that means in a fire scenario. This definitions section is going to focus on, not only the definition of the word, but also on the reason it may be important in a fire test condition. The hope is that this will help you take a closer look when you are inspecting these various elements of the firestop assemblies. We will give you a new word or a new concept every week and each one will be intended to change the way you may be inspecting firestop. If you know firestop it may not be a new word, but hopefully you will see the word in a new light. Let us know if we have changed the way you inspect.

 

INTUMESCENT-

Intumescent basically means to expand. So if you play rugby and catch an elbow in the mouth while getting tackled to the ground, your lip will intumesce and you will have earned your post game beer. (If you need to explain this to someone else, feel free to insert any sport analogy you wish as long. As it ends in some sort of facial contact and you will get the same image.) The difference with firestop is, that instead of a blow to the face as the catalyst for the expansion, we are looking at heat from a fire. Instead of blood rushing to the area to create swelling, we are dealing with a chemical reaction that causes the materials to enlarge, expand and fill any voids created by combustible materials or movement during a fire.

 

So intumescent material is all the same, right?

 

NO WAY!

Different sealants will expand at different rates and at different temperatures because they are made with different chemical combinations. A basic intumescent sealant will not expand any where near as much as a wrap strip. Some wrap strips will perform differently than others. In fact, some manufacturers have different grades of wrap strip. These will perform dramatically different. Some will require more material some will require less. Some will cost more and some are considerably cheaper.

 

When inspecting firestop it is critical that you make sure that the material shown on the tested and listed detail that was submitted and approved for the project, is the same thing that is being installed.

 

If you are the inspector you may think I’m crazy or you may be cringing thinking of all the paperwork you would have to carry. When I train installers I tell them flat out, that if they want to look better than their competition, they should post a copy of the submittal on every floor. Then when the inspector had a question, the answers were right there for them. When the installer had a question, they knew where to do for the answers as well.   Here is a hint- if your firestop installer doesn’t have a copy of the submittals on the floor where they are working, then this means they are not looking at the details. If they are not looking at the firestop details, how do you expect them to be installing something that conforms to these same missing details?

 

Next week we will discuss annular space- we will talk about the gap and when we are done you may have another reason to change the way you inspect.  If this was useful, let us know.