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Firestop Special Inspection- Reducing Confusion

Firestop special inspection is a relatively new requirement in our building codes. This three part series is designed to help architects and building officials understand how this code change impacts their responsibilities. Understanding how to verify that you have someone who is capable and qualified to do this work for your team is critical and this video is designed to help. While we are not digging into the requirements of the building code or the inspection standards this information is from the ICC Special Inspection Manual.

Our first video in this series will show you an easy way to confirm that your special inspector meets the requirements of the inspection manual. The next two videos to follow will explain the responsibilities of the building official and the architect as they are called out in the ICC Special Inspection Manual.

If you are an architect or a building official, we hope this video helps you do your job a little more easily.

If you have any questions, feel free to reach out to us!

Firestop at Head of Wall Joints

Firestop at head of wall joints seems like a basic installation, but this video is designed to help you look at this basic installation a bit more critically so you can ensure the life safety of your projects meets codes and standards.

The world is a weirdly different place, where its not rude to walk to the other side of the street when you see someone coming. Many of you know that I am in NJ so with this change in place I have decided to to come up with a Covid Creation to share with you all. This will be a series of videos that will focus on fire rated joints. In time we will add in membrane and through penetrations as well, but we have to start somewhere and since I have a sponsor for a few of the videos I figured this was as good a place to start as any.

I hope this serves you and maybe entertains you a little as you learn.

Please let me know what you think of this video, other topics you would find valuable and any suggestions to make this better.

You can check out the video here.  If you like this, please subscribe to the channel, like, share and comment on it for me.

Be safe everyone!

How to properly patch a two hour rated wall.

Welcome back. We are still hunkered down in the Halpert Home and still talking about how to properly patch a rated wall. I’m having a great time putting together these videos for you and can’t wait to share them with you.  We are going to stick to the same topic as last week, which is patching rated walls. Now you know how to patch a one hour rated wall but that document didn’t really give you enough specifics to know how to patch a two hour rated wall. We can fix that today though.

 

If you know me, you know I used to live in Las Vegas. Las Vegas is in Clark County, NV and  the building officials are county officials.   The only reason this matters is because they have this awesome document that relates to the discussion of patching rated walls. They took the Gypsum Association document I shared with you last week and mandated that for repair of rated gypsum walls.

 

Here is their Field Inspection Guide (FIG). If you have any questions about what to do, this is a great place to start.  The Gypsum Associate document I share last week didn’t really get into specifics about how to patch a two hour rated assembly the way the FIG does, so I wanted to share this with you as well. Of course you can always reach out to your drywall manufacturer to get help finding solutions. US Gyp and National both have stellar people on staff who can help if you need it or you can always call me. I’m happy to help as well.  https://www.clarkcountynv.gov/building/HowToGuides/FIG-B-021.pdf

 

How are you patching your 1 hour rated walls?

Today’s Topic- How do you properly patch a one hour rated wall?

 

Hi everyone. I hope you are doing well despite the lock down and virus. We are breathing easy over here and I pray that the same is true for you, your family and your teams.

 

I have been capitalizing on this time to develop a new skill and I can’t wait to share the results with you. It will be some training videos.

 

One of them will discuss the difference between regular drywall and type X, another will talk about type X drywall vs type C.  Since that is all coming down the pike in the next week or two, I wanted to share somethings that will compliment that discussion.

 

Once you have built a rated wall at some point in time its likely SOMEONE will poke a hole in it. This could happen during construction if someone decides to relocate a pipe for example.

 

So how do you patch it. If you ask the Gypsum Association, this is how you should patch a rated wall. Please take a moment to look over this so you understand. One of the videos that will be coming  will talk about how rated walls are tested, but the one that I hope to get to you first will talk about the difference between regular drywall and we will have a complex discussion about fire dynamics that is actually kinda fun. For now, I will leave you with this from US!

 

Next week we will talk about how to patch a two hour rated wall, because those are really different.

 

https://www.gypsum.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/GA-225-15.pdf

 

Firestop Movement New Test Criteria

Have you ever wondered if building movement may impact a firestop installations ability to perform?   Fire rated joints have movement listed as part of their systems, but until now the through penetrations did not. There is a new test standard that will address this missing element.

ASTM E3037 is an interesting new standard that may be valuable to architects, engineers, specifiers and others.  It looks at the movement that a firestop system can (or can’t) accommodate.  It looks at movement in two directions.

  1.  in and out of the assembly
  2.  perpendicular to the assembly

I have a handful of questions and you likely do as well. It will be interesting to see how this all pans out as people start to apply it in the field.  Here is a great start to understanding what this test standard is, how it is conducted and possibly applied.

Thank you to UL and Luke Woods for putting this video together for everyone.  You can watch it here.

 

PS thanks to John Valiulus for sharing this

T-ratings

If you have been following this blog for a while you are likely familiar with T ratings. If you aren’t, you can check them out here. If you already know about T ratings, you can skip that link if you prefer.

I cant tell you how many projects I have been involved with that don’t adhere to the T-rating requirements in the building code.  People say, “We’ve never done that before.”, too which I historically responded with, it’s been in the codes since before the IBC (which was adopted in 2000- I believe the city of Phoenix was the first to adopt the new code.) but the T rating requirements existed before the IBC. What I didn’t know was WHEN were they first introduced and why.  That is until I met Glenn!

 

If you have been following this blog, you likely know that I am a total code geek?

Well so is this guy, Glenn. He takes it to a whole new level because he has a stash of old code cooks. That makes him the perfect guy when you have a question about code history. I wanted to know when T ratings first came into the codes.  Glenn was able to tell me. Check out this awesome video he shared if you want to know for yourself.  Follow him on Linked in, YouTube or any venue you like.

 

NFPA 285- Test for exterior facades

If you have a building in your community that has an exterior face of aluminum panels with polyethylene core. Here is a great video from UL that shows you the unfortunate fire test results you might expect.  These fire tests are critical to understanding how buildings should be designed and the intrinsic link to the role of fire fighters if there is a fire in your community. Thanks to Sean DeCrane, Dwayne Sloan, UL and IAFF.

UL Future Built Forum- Combustible Facade Risks- FDNY

Today is another discussion from the Future Built Forum last year held by UL, FDNY and IAFF. This particular presentation was from FDNY and discussed the risks of combustible facades. You can review it here.

Thanks to UL, FDNY and IAFF for all of the information they have allowed us to share. If you have the opportunity to attend one of these events in your region, don’t hesitate. It is time well spent.

UL Future Built Forum- Fundamentals of Facades

This presentation goes over some fundaments of the building envelope. If you are involved in construction this is another valuable presenatation from the Future Built Forum last January hosted by UL, FDNY and IAFF.

Please take time to review the presentation here.

All the best,

Sharron

UL Future Built Forum- Exterior Facade Flamability- Global Overview

Do you want to take a look at exterior facades on a global scale. This presentation was from the UL Future Built Forum a year ago and as can be expected is packed with valuable information. You can check it out here.